Thursday, July 31, 2008

Canadian History Through the Art of Norval Morrisseau (Part II)

-
- The Arrival of Christianity
-

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"The Coming of the Black Robe", © 1977 Norval Morrisseau
-
-
"When the Jesuits came, the Indian was already around. The Indian did not understand them. He tried to understand them, what they were up to. He knew that they were going to be there for awhile. He knew how sad it was, seeing his people, how low they were put, how they had previously enjoyed living and needed to live freely again. How do we go about doing that now? We need images. We’re going to use images ourselves."
-
Norval Morrisseau
-
Reference posting: Canadian History Through the Art of Norval Morrisseau (Part I)
-
-
* The painting in this posting: "The Coming of the Black Robe", 46"x71", © 1977 Norval Morrisseau /Private Collection/

Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Words of Genius XVIII

--
-
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-
-

-"Personally I am not thinking about myself truthfully in this present year but years ahead when I am death for the children of mine and the generations of my people to feel proud of the art heritage of the Ojibway and every nationality is proud of its culture."-

Norval Morrisseau-

* This posting's still image of Norval Morrisseau from National Film Board of Canada’s "The Paradox of Norval Morrisseau" documentary; © 1974 NFB

Tuesday, July 29, 2008

Stories from the Seventh Fire

-
- The Four Seasons Series (DVD)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
© 1999 Storytellers Productions Inc.
-
This series is the superb achievement of a unique and powerful collaboration. Gifted Native North American artists, animators, storytellers, actors and filmmakers have lovingly produced these animated legends for our new era, for all to share. World-renowned Ojibway artist Norval Morrisseau’s paintings come alive with beautiful animations of Wesakechack, and the legends are narrated by actor and storyteller Tantoo Cardinal.
-
- DVD 1: Spring - The First Spring Flood; Legend of the Giant Beaver;
- DVD 2: Summer - How Wesakechak Got His Name; Legend of the Caribou ;
- DVD 3: Autumn - Wesakechak and the Medicine ; Legend of the First Thanksgiving;
- DVD 4: Winter - Why the Rabbit Turns White; Legend of the Spirit Bear.
-
> Teachers Guides (pdf): Autumn Spring Summer Winter.
-
- Awards:
* Best Animation at the 2003 Japan Wildlife Festival,
* Merit Award for Children's Animation at the 2003 International Wildlife Festival,
* Best Animation at the 2003 Yorkton Short Film Festival,
* Best Program for Children at the Telenatura 2002 Awards (Pamplona, Spain).
-
Note: Produced by Gerri Cook (Dinosaur Soup Productions, Edmonton), Greg Coyes (Scorched Wood Communications, Vancouver) and Ava Karvonen (Karvonen Films, Edmonton).

Monday, July 28, 2008

North American Native Wisdom (Part I)

"Words of Fire, Deeds of Blood"

© Music by Robbie Robertson & the Red Road Ensemble; Words of Chief Joseph spoken by Robbie Robertson

Compiled by timetorightwrongs

Joseph the Younger succeeded his father as chief in 1871. Before his death, the latter counseled his son:

"My son, my body is returning to my mother earth, and my spirit is going very soon to see the Great Spirit Chief. When I am gone, think of your country. You are the chief of these people. They look to you to guide them. Always remember that your father never sold his country. You must stop your ears whenever you are asked to sign a treaty selling your home. A few years more, and white men will be all around you. They have their eyes on this land. My son, never forget my dying words. This country holds your father's body. Never sell the bones of your father and your mother."

CHIEF JOSEPH*

* Chief Joseph (March 3, 1840 - September 21, 1904) was the chief of the band of Nez Perce Indians during General Oliver O. Howard's attempt to forcibly remove his band and the other "non-treaty" Indians to a reservation in Idaho. For his principled resistance to the removal, he became renowned as a humanitarian and peacemaker.

- "You Tube" presentation

* To view all "You Tube" presentations on the NORVAL MORRISSEAU BLOG click HERE.

Sunday, July 27, 2008

Collectors' Corner VI

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"Untitled", © 1971 Norval Morrisseau
-
-
Another painting from a collector who wrote the following:
-
"These paintings were bought directly from Norval Morrisseau in 1971. We were living in Kenora, Ontario at that time. Until this meeting we had never met him but had heard much about this colorful artist from our friend Robert Lavack (at that time a consultant with the Ontario Department of Education and who has recently coauthored the book “The Morrisseau Papers”). Robert had become a very good friend of Norval Morrisseau and had been pushing for his work to become recognized. In fact he had furnished him with the art materials that Norval used to do the paintings we were able to choose from.
-
How the purchase of our paintings came about was this: Some friend advised us that Norval Morrisseau had just been released from the Kenora jail where he had been incarcerated as a result of a drunk and disorderly charge and was at the hotel Kenrecia with a number of paintings he had done during his jail time. And that he was interested in selling these paintings.
-
I was away at the time but my wife went to see him. She remembers him as a perfect gentleman and they had a friendly chat. Out of the numerous paintings he showed her she picked fourteen, six of which we have after all these years and are the paintings in these pictures"
-
Reference posting: Collector's Corner III
-
"Let's share Norval Morrisseau's images with the World."
-
-
* Blog Master is thanking a collector for the submission of an image of the original painting by Norval Morrisseau and respects his/her decision to remain anonymous: "Untitled", 21"x27", © 1971 Norval Morrisseau

Friday, July 25, 2008

Earth Drum (Part I)

-
Thunder Dreamer
-

© SEQUOIA RECORDS
-
"In the distance are gathering clouds born upon the Rocky Mountain heights. "I call upon the magician, the herald, the thunder dreamer. Welcome conjurer and grace us with laughter and joy. Bring us blessings of rain and abundance for the good of all."
-
"May all peoples of the Earth walk in Peace."
-
- From the DVD of "Earth Drum" by David & Steve Gordon - imagery of the great forests and peaks of the Rocky Mountains /© Sequoia Records/
-
* "You Tube" presentation
-
* To view all "You Tube" presentations on the NORVAL MORRISSEAU BLOG click HERE.

Thursday, July 24, 2008

Family of Norval Morrisseau (Part I)

-
"FAMILY MEMBERS THROUGH HIS ART"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-
-

-

-

--
"Otter With Michael", © 1985 Norval Morrisseau
-
-
In 1957 Norval Morrisseau married Harriet Kakegamic (sister of Henry, Joshim and Goyce Kakegamic) who was from Sandy Lake Reserve northeast of Red Lake. They met in Fort William (now Thunder Bay) at the tuberculosis sanatorium while Morrisseau was receiving treatment. They arrived in Cochenour, Ontario in 1959 to work in the Cochenour-Willans gold mine.
-
Harriet inspired him in his work and taught him Cree syllabics, form of writing developed by Methodist missionary James Evans in the 1840s, reflected in Morrisseau's own signature of his works (Copper Thunderbird).
-
Their children were born from 1957-1975 as the family moved between Beardmore, Cochenour, Sandy Lake, McKenzie Island and Red Lake. Morrisseau reportedly enjoyed children and one large portrait of his daughter, Victoria, with his first grandson ("Victoria and Family"), conveys pride and love.
-
Norval Morrisseau & Harriet Morrisseau (Kakegamic) have 7 children by direct bloodline (David, Michael, Peter, Eugene, Christian, Victoria and Lisa), 18 Grandchildren and 13 Great Grandchildren.
-
-
* The painting in this posting: "Otter With Michael", 30"x30", © 1985 Norval Morrisseau /Private Collection/

Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Norval Morrisseau's "Twins" (Part II)

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
© Norval Morrisseau
-
-
This is another example showing that Norval repeated his images. This particular example involves two paintings painted in the late 1980s or beginning of the 1990s.
-
Spirit Walker
-
IMPORTANT NOTE TO COLLECTORS: Do not be alarmed if your painting by Norval Morrisseau resembles other paintings that you have seen in publications or online. Norval Morrisseau repeated his images and themes many times in his career as a Woodland Artist. No two paintings are identical but certainly can be similar.
-
More examples to follow SOON...
-
Reference posting: Norval Morrisseau's "Twins" (Part I)
-
-
*Detailed information of images presented in this posting not known, © Norval Morrisseau

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

Things to ponder (Part II)

-
- 1970's PERIOD
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
© 1970s Norval Morrisseau
-
-
Why are some members of ADAC* and some galleries refusing to authenticate and/or appraise Norval Morrisseau's artwork?
-
It is very odd that collectors of Norval Morrisseau's art are willing to pay these experts to provide them with an authentication and/or appraisal document are being refused said services?

-
Spirit Walker
-
*ADAC - Art Dealers Association Of Canada
-
-
* The painting in this posting: "Title not known", © c.1970s Norval Morrisseau /Private Collection/

Monday, July 21, 2008

A Brief Ojibway History (Part II)

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

-
-
-
-
-
"Medicine Man", © 1970s Norval Morrisseau
-
-
The heartland of the Ojibwa country is located at what is present-day Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, USA. The Ojibwa migration path was from the lower St. Lawrence River up through the Ottawa River at present-day Montreal. Then they crossed Lake Nipissing to Lake Huron and continued northwest behind Manitoulin Island to the St. Mary's River. A significant place near the end of their journey was the Straits of Mackinac, which is the waterway separating the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of Michigan. According to the widely accepted account, this was the place that members of the group separated into three divisions.
-
The Potawatomis moved south into lower Michigan, the Ottawas occupied Manitoulin Island their base, and the Ojibwas continued north about fifty miles to the falls of the St. Mary's River, their final destination. After several centuries of population growth, part of that group branched off to establish a new base on the south shore of Lake Superior at Chequamegon Bay in present-day Wisconsin.
-
This history is known because leaders in the ceremonies of the Midewiwin preserved maps of the long migration.
-
The Midewiwin is a physically and spiritually healing medicine society that originated among the Ojibwa people. To enter the society, an initiate must undergo a long period of instruction to master the herbal knowledge and philosophy handed down by elders. The Midewiwin today has a strong membership in the upper Great Lakes region and has spread from the Ojibwas to other surrounding Indian people. The philosophy of the medicine society stresses the importance of maintaining balance in one's personal life as well as respect for other forms of life, both plant and animal, with the goal of achieving harmony within the social order.
-
Because they live on a major transcontinental waterway, the Ojibwas became involved in intertribal hostilities, peacemaking, and trade over a much of interior North America. In 1662, during Iroquois warfare to gain new hunting grounds (1649-1700), the Ojibwas and local allies defeated a large war party, which resulted in future Iroquois raids being directed south of the Great Lakes. Beginning about 1680, the Missisagis and other Ojibwa bands living east of the Sault on the north shore of Lake Huron began advancing south across the Ontario peninsula, which drove out the Iroquois invaders. By the late 1600s they established their own communities in the area extending from present-day Detroit to the north shore of Lake Ontario. The name 'Missisagi' continued to be used in southern Ontario to identify these eastern Ojibwas. By 1750 they had moved around the bottom of Lake Huron into the Saginaw Valley of southeastern Michigan. Most of their Ottawa predecessors moved to northwest lower Michigan and along the north shore of Lake Michigan, or to the Ottawa village at Detroit.
-
Ojibwa leaders were important in all the major campaigns of eighteenth-century warfare that affected their hunting grounds and their trading connections. During the French and Indian War (1753-1760) Wabojig led warriors from Chequamegon Bay to battles in upstate New York. They continued to oppose the advance of white settlement in the lower Great Lakes region until the era of the War of 1812.
-
While all these historical developments were part of the Ojibwa country's story east and south of Sault Ste. Marie, actions in the west were directed toward expanding hunting territory beyond Lake Superior. From the time of their first village settlement at Chequamegon Bay, Ojibwas had battled two tribes a number of times who became traditional enemies: the Mesquakies (Foxes) to the south, around the headwaters of the St. Croix River in Wisconsin; and the Dakotas (Sioux) to the west, on the headwaters of the Mississippi River. By 1683, the Mesquakies had moved south, but conflict with the Sioux persisted until the mid-nineteenth century. Following an interval of peace and trade, aggressive warfare had resumed by 1740, leading to the advance of Ojibwa hunters into Sioux lands in present-day northern Minnesota. The Ojibwas also had the assistance of Cree and Assiniboine allies, who attacked the Dakotas from the north. After Crees living northwest of Lake Superior suffered much population loss during the 1782 smallpox epidemic, they invited Ojibwas to join them in their country.
-
As a result, Ojibwa communities occupied the Rainy River, Lake of the Woods, Red Lake, and lower Red River districts south of Lake Winnipeg by 1790. Some buffalo hunters from the Ojibwa community migrated to the Dakota border region. One offshoot from the Ojibwa, the Little Shell Band, went farther west into Montana. In the district of future Winnipeg, the Ojibwa leader of the 1790s became an intermediary with early settlers and officials. The Ojibwa bands acquired horses around 1820, and made their way westward to trade near present-day Edmonton, Alberta. It was at this time that the names Plains Saulteaux and Plains Ojibwa came into use.
-
Source: http://www.bulk-essiac-tea.com/ojibwa-essiac.html
-
-
* The painting in this posting: “Medicine Man, 41"x25", © c. 1970s Norval Morrisseau

Saturday, July 19, 2008

Phil Fontaine about Norval Morrisseau

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"Norval Morrisseau's courageous and often controversial approach to his work was instrumental in encouraging First Nations people to know their spirituality, history and culture in order to better understand themselves. He taught us to be proud of who we are. He inspired countless other First Nations people to pursue a career in the arts. His legacy will remain with us and continue to inspire all Canadians for many generations to come."
-
Phil Fontaine - Assembly of First Nations National Chief--
-
* Photography by John Lucas, CanWest News Service

Friday, July 18, 2008

Words of Genius XVII

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"Child Speaks With Bird", © c. 1980s Norval Morrisseau
-
-
"To accomplish what I have started and to die in it feeling I have fulfilled what I started - to reach a level where I and Manitou and the Indian will always keep the Indian faith alive - to be a great Artist and Preserver of Indian culture. I accept it fully as a duty in life which was set forth for, to set an example."
-
Norval Morrisseau, c. 1966
-
-
* The painting in this posting: "Child Speaks With Bird", 26"x16", © c. 1980s Norval Morrisseau /Private Collection/

Collectors' Corner V

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"Untitled", © 1976 Norval Morrisseau
-
-
"Let's share Norval Morrisseau's images with the World."
-spiritwalker2008@gmail.com
-
-

* Blog Master is thanking a collector who used to own above presented original painting by Norval Morrisseau and respects his/her decision to remain anonymous: "Untitled", size not known, © 1976 Norval Morrisseau

Thursday, July 17, 2008

Honouring Ancestral Spirits of the Anishnaabe

-
@ Agawa Rock, Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario, CANADA
-

-
Compiled by © John Wanserski
-
-
One of the most famous pictograph sites in Canada is found in Agawa Bay, within Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario. The site's name in Ojibway is Mazinaubikiniguning, which means "the adorned rock on Agawa Lake." The site was discovered by Selwyn Dewdney in 1958, although it had already been reported by the ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft. The latter had also received the interpretation of the paintings at the beginning of the 19th century, although he never actually saw them. It was while carrying out surveys of First Nation populations around Sault Ste Marie that Schoolcraft met Shingwaukonce, who drew for him on birch bark the painted figures as he remembered them.
-
Some of the rock paintings are at least 1500 years old, while others may only date back to the 1800s. The Ojibway people believed that spirits concentrated in the rock outcroppings of the Lake Superior shore, which belonged to the mysterious domain of the powerful Ojibway sea monster Mishipizheu (also known as the Great Horned Lynx). The first printed reference to the Agawa pictographs occurred in ethnographer Henry Schoolcraft's 1851 study "The American Indians. Their History, Condition and Prospects." The pictographs, recount the daring crossing of eastern Lake Superior by a fleet of war canoes, led by the warrior and medicine man Myeengun, with the blessing of Mishipizheu.
-
The Agawa Bay pictograph site was one of the important inspirations to Norval Morrisseau.
-
-
Other related links:
-
- Lake Superior Provincial Park,
- Agawa Pictograph Site,
- Ojibway History,
- Henry Schoolcraft's personal memoirs,
- History of Lake Superior Timeline,
- Selwyn Dewdney about Norval Morrisseau.
-
* "You Tube" presentation
-
* To view all "You Tube" presentations on the NORVAL MORRISSEAU BLOG click HERE.
-

Wednesday, July 16, 2008

THE HELEN E. BAND COLLECTION

-
Significant Collection of First Nations Art
@ Thunder Bay Art Gallery, Thunder Bay, Ontario
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

-
-
-
"Onaman Legend", © 1978 Norval Morrisseau
/The HELEN E. BAND Collection - Thunder Bay Art Gallery, Thunder Bay, Ontario/
-
-
The significance of the Helen E. Band Collection lies in the early dates and excellent quality of the works. Focusing primarily upon the 1970's and early 1980's, this collection features works by all of the major First Nations artists active during this seminal time period. A comprehensive survey of the Woodland School of painting can be found in the early works of Norval Morrisseau, Manitoulin artists such as Daphne Odjig, Blake Debassige, James A. Simon MISHIBINIJIMA, Carl Beam and Angus Trudeau, and Northwestern Ontario artists Carl Ray, Saul Williams, Goyce Kakegamic, Joshim Kakegamic, and Roy Thomas.

In 1994, the estate of the late Helen E. Band donated 138 artworks by 42 First Nations artists to the Thunder Bay Art Gallery. This collection complimented the already well-established collection of Native art at the gallery. The daughter of Toronto art collector, Charles S. Band, renowned for his collection of paintings by members of the Group of Seven, Helen Band understood both the need for specialization and the importance of acquiring the best work available. She began her collection in the early 1960's choosing Indian art as her focus. Although this was then regarded as an unconventional collecting direction, she was able to share her interest and enthusiasm with a growing number of other collectors in Toronto. Maclean's Magazine, in an article in the 1960's referred to the times as "the renaissance of Indian art."

Helen Band collected wisely and well. In 1992, she passed away suddenly at the age of sixty-nine. Her passing away was a great loss to the Canadian art scene. The impact she had on the perception and acceptance of Native art, on the artists themselves and on collections is most significant. The Helen E. Band Collection remains as tangible evidence of her dedication to contemporary First Nations art.
-
-
Note: To see some of the works from the Thunder Bay Art Gallery's Helen E. Band Collection click HERE (Thunder Bay Art Gallery) & HERE (University of Toronto's Justina M Barnicke Gallery/Hart House).
-
-
* The image in this posting: "Onaman Legend", 53"x52", © 1978 Norval Morrisseau /"Helen E. Band Collection" of the Thunder Bay art Gallery, Thunder Bay, Ontario, CANADA/

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Collectors' Corner IV

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"Flower Children", © 1987 Norval Morrisseau
-
-
"The Shaman Artist
Wishes to express to us
Through
The art form
That we are all
Like children
-
Our childlike simplicity
With dignity and sweet humility
We view
One environment
and
Remind us of the Pure Spirit
Expressing itself upon ourselves."
-
Norval Morrisseau, 1983
-
-
"Let's share Norval Morrisseau's images with the World."
-
-
* Blog Master is thanking a collector for the submission of an image of the original painting by Norval Morrisseau and respects his/her decision to remain anonymous: "Flower Children", 36"x24" each panel, © 1987 Norval Morrisseau

Monday, July 14, 2008

The Art of Norval Morrisseau in Galleries and Museums Around the World (Part IV)

-
MacKenzie Art Gallery
/Regina, Saskatchewan, CANADA/
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"White Man's Curse", © 1969 Norval Morrisseau
-
"We natives believe in the following saying: "Our God is Native. The Great Deity of the Five Planes is so. We are neither for nor against, We speak not of Christ nor of God. We say, 'Let them be. 'We follow the Spirit on its Inward Journey of Soul through attitudes and attentions. Remember we are all in a big School and the Inner Master teaches us Experience over many Lifetimes."
-
Norval Morrisseau
-
* The painting in this posting: "White Man's Curse", 50"x40", © 1969 Norval Morrisseau /Collection of the MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina, Saskatchewan, CANADA - purchased with the financial support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program; Item: 1999-017/

Sunday, July 13, 2008

Collectors' Corner III

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"Untitled", © 1971 Norval Morrisseau
-
-
I would like to once again invite of the collectors of Norval Morrisseau art to send images of their paintings to be posted in the "Collectors' Corner". It will be providing space for collectors to exhibit their art and for others to post their opinions about art being presented herein.
-
All of the paintings or selection of the paintings from each individual that submit their paintings will be posted in this category.
-
Conditions are that images need to be high resolution and images of the front and back sides need to be submitted with inclusion of title, size, inscription and date if available.
-
If you feel that you would like to preserve your identity you can always use fictitious e-mail address(s) at Hotmail, Yahoo or Google and send the images that way.
-
"Let's share Norval Morrisseau's images with the World."
-
Note: If you include more images than just a single one please note images in order of importance that I can post the most important image(s) first.
-
Spirit Walker
-
* Blog Master is thanking a collector for the submission of an image of the original painting by Norval Morrisseau and respects his/her decision to remain anonymous: "Untitled", 22"x28", © 1971 Norval Morrisseau

Saturday, July 12, 2008

"Copper Thunderbird: Invention, Inspiration and Transformation" at UVic's Legacy Gallery opened on WEDNESDAY!

July 9th, 2008 - November 30th, 2008
-
@ 630 Yates Street, Victoria, British Columbia
-
-
-

-


-


-


-


-


-


"Untitled", © 1979 Norval Morrisseau
/Michael C. Williams Collection/
-
-
SET DESIGNER FELT MORRISSEAU'S PRESENCE
Art show features costumes from Copper Thunderbird
-
Grania Litwin, Times Colonist; Published: Thursday, July 10, 2008
-
What: Norval Morrisseau exhibition
-
Where: Legacy Art Gallery and Café, 630 Yates St.

Celebrated production designer Mary Kerr has worked for many years in dance, opera, film, television and extravagant special events.
-
But when the University of Victoria theatre professor was asked to create sets and costumes for Copper Thunderbird - a play about the invention, inspiration and soulful journey of revered First Nations artist Norval Morrisseau - she was both terrified and exhilarated.
"It was payback time," she said flatly.
-
She had met Morrisseau while an art student in Winnipeg and helped uncrate pictures for an early show. "He was leaning against a wall in this funny, flecked, really bad suit with cuffs and white socks. His greasy black hair was pulled back and he was very thin. He was an intense presence, smoking and watching us intently."
-
Opening the crates, she was awed by the strong black outlines, graphic strength of line, flatness of imagery, X-ray interiors and medicine snakes in bright colours.
-
"He has been a presence with me ever since," said Kerr, who was at the Legacy Art Gallery helping uncrate and hang another exhibition this week. It features a dozen works by Morrisseau, who died in 2007, as well as costumes, paintings and pictures of her set designs for Copper Thunderbird, which was performed at Ottawa's National Arts Centre last year. There are also works by several artists inspired by Morrisseau's Woodland School.
-
"Morrisseau has been on my radar ever since I met him and to be honest, I felt his presence through the creation of the play. Every now and then, when I would get stuck, I felt him guiding me," said Kerr, who designed the opening and closing ceremonies for the Commonwealth Games in 1994. She has also worked with the Canadian Opera Company, the Paris Opera Ballet, the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, the Danny Grossman Dance Theatre, the National Ballet of Canada, the Shaw and Stratford Festivals, and most of this country's regional theatres.
-
Her creative process always involves a leap to an inner space "where magic happens," and that's partly why she feels a strong connection to Morrisseau. He called his source the House of Invention, and described how his soul travelled there for inspiration and renewal.
"I think everyone has that ability, but many have turned off the switch," said Kerr, who feels lucky to have sustained the connection. "But it doesn't mean I'm not terrified each and every time I start a new project, that I may not be up to the standards of a great writer, a great musician, a great painter." For instance, in Copper Thunderbird, she didn't want to simply document the artist's life or project huge images of his work on stage. "I wanted to open up and explore his brain."
-
She explains that Morrisseau's art, and her own, are about service and healing. "Colour is one of the most joyous things in our lives and he often talked about its healing power." She recalls looking at a picture of his many years ago. "It was of a shaman, and suddenly I felt pushed back by it, so dizzy I could hardly see straight. That painting was still working," she said with a broad smile.
-
The exhibition, which includes several works from the collection of the late Michael C. Williams, is co-curated by Martin Segger and University of Victoria fine art student Marlaina Buch.
-
Grania Litwin
-
-
* The image in this posting: "Untitled", 36"x35", © 1979 Norval Morrisseau /Provenance: formerly owned by Michael C. Williams and donated to UVic as part of his estate; Michael C. Williams Collection - now part of the MALTWOOD Art Museum & Gallery Collection/

Friday, July 11, 2008

Poetry of my people The Great Ojibway (Part I)

- -
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

"Great Journey", © Norval Morrisseau -
-
-
Anishinaabekwe, the Daughters,
You are the keepers of the water.
-
I am Nibi... water.. the sacred source,
the blood of Aki, Mother Earth,
the force filling dry seeds to great bursting.
-
I am the wombs cradle.
I purify.
-
Nibi, the lifegiver, forever the Circle's charge
I have coursed through our Mother's veins.
-
Now hear my sorrow and my pain
in the river's rush, the rain.
-
I am your grandchildren's drink.
Listen, Daughters, always.
-
You are the keepers of the water.
Hear my cry, for the springs flow darkly now
through the heart of Aki.
-
Unknown
-
-
* The painting in this posting: "Great Journey", 22"x42", © 1976 Norval Morrisseau /Private Collection/

Thursday, July 10, 2008

Words of Genius XVI

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"Armed with an arsenal of heavenly designs and sculptures, the priests were prepared and fearless. With their unlimited resources and soldiers they were sent to conquer the New World and bring their culture and religion to every corner."
-
Norval Morrisseau
-
* This posting's still image of Norval Morrisseau from National Film Board of Canada’s "The Paradox of Norval Morrisseau" documentary; © 1974 NFB

Wednesday, July 9, 2008

"Copper Thunderbird: Invention, Inspiration and Transformation" at UVic's Legacy Gallery opens TODAY!


July 9th, 2008 - November 30th, 2008-

@ 630 Yates Street, Victoria, British Columbia-

-

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"Norval Wife & Norval Man", © Mary Kerr
/The costumes designed for the National Arts Centre presentation of "Copper Thunderbird"/

-

-More than 15 paintings influenced or created by internationally renowned Anishnaabe artist Norval Morrisseau will be on display at the Legacy Art Gallery and Cafe from July 9th, 2008 to November 30th, 2008.

"Copper Thunderbird: Invention, Inspiration and Transformation" will feature painted works spanning three decades, as well as sets, costumes, drawings, and photographs designed by celebrated Canadian stage designer and UVic theatre professor Mary Kerr from "Copper Thunderbird", the biographical play about Norval Morrisseau recently staged at the National Arts Center in Ottawa.

This exhibit honors Michael Williams' request to make UVic's collection of contemporary art available to the public in a downtown setting.

The gallery, located at 630 Yates Street is open from Wednesday to Sunday, 10 AM to 5 PM. Admission is free.

The exhibit is sponsored by Westerkirk Works of Art Inc. and the National Arts Centre.

* Illustrations for this posting of are of the two costumes of UVic Theatre Professor Mary Kerr (Norval Wife & Norval Man) she designed for the National Arts Centre presentation of "Copper Thunderbird", a play about the life of one of Canada's great artists, Norval Morrisseau

Tuesday, July 8, 2008

Others about Norval Morrisseau

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"The Art of Norval Morrisseau Collage"- compiled by Spirit Walker
-



"How was it possible for this youth to reach back to the old feelings, to conceive the images that would bear the unmistakable stamp of his people? How could this firm pride originate in a community relegated to the status of third class citizens, constantly reminded of this status and defeated by it? What was there about this lad that earned for him in a medicine woman's dream the combined names of a powerful spirit and the metal traditionally sacred to the Lake Superior Ojibway- Copper Thunderbird?" - Selwyn Dewdney

-

"...Norval, with his incredible ability with the formal problems of art (colour-design-space) and his commitment to the world of his people, the great Ojibway, give one the sense of power that only genius provides... It is sufficient to say that in the history of Canadian Painting, few have, and will remain giants. Norval shall." - Jack Pollock
-
-
"Morrisseau's genius for unifying or braking space in his designs is astonishing, as sureness of line. It cannot be classed as primitive art, because both the ideas and the expression evince cultivated thought. As this mysticism has never been recorded he is breaking new ground." - Pearl McCarthy
-
-
"Norval Morrisseau stands alone in his formal innovation and largeness of personal vision. He was the first Indian to study seriously and to update his own cultural beliefs and translate them visually for contemporary Indian and non-Indian audiences. In doing so he became the first Indian to break through the Canadian professional white-art barrier. His brilliance lies in his ability to break away from his own conventions, to constantly renew his vision." - Elizabeth McLuhan
-
-
"He is one of the greatest painters Canada has ever produced. One day we were looking at the Group of Seven and he commented 'They paint trees, I paint loons and they connect to the sky'". - Tom Hill
-
-
"Norval, like all innovators, had made a trajectory to contemporary cultural theory, an idea I was not to understand until quite recently. It situated Norval at the centre of a cultural transformation, contemporary Ojibwa art. This legendary artist had created a visual language whose lineage included the ancient shaman artists of the Midiwewin scrolls, the Agawa Bay rock paintings and the Peterborough petroglyphs. As a master narrator, he had a voice that thundered like the sentinel of a people still listening to the stories told since creation.” - Robert Houle
-
-
"I believe that when Canada 'disappears', Morrisseau will remain. I believe history will note that Norval Morrisseau will be better known than Pablo Picasso. He's more original." - Robert McMichael
-
-
''He was a role model, visionary and seminal force throughout Native America and Canada. We were especially fortunate to have the great man himself present at the opening of his major retrospective, 'Norval Morrisseau: Shaman Artist,' at our New York City museum. Through his groundbreaking and vibrant works, he positioned his rich indigenous heritage squarely within modern art; a revolutionary and uplifting achievement that influences contemporary culture through today.'" - Kevin Gover
-
-
"Norval Morrisseau's most significant and enduring achievement will be measured over generations as the lasting impact of his greatest ambition - to instill pride - makes itself felt in the art of new artists compelled to create by his masterful paintings." - Greg A. Hill
-
-
"Their great appeal partly derives from Mr. Morrisseau's marrying of an understanding of Indian spirituality with his own formal ambitions as a painter... New York has many museums with countless exhibitions, but it's been a long time since I saw a show of such potent spirituality, warmth and feeling." - Benjamin Genocchio

-

Norval Morrisseau's courageous and often controversial approach to his work was instrumental in encouraging First Nations people to know their spirituality, history and culture in order to better understand themselves. He taught us to be proud of who we are. He inspired countless other First Nations people to pursue a career in the arts. His legacy will remain with us and continue to inspire all Canadians for many generations to come."- Phil Fontaine
-
-
*Collage in this posting consisted of multiple book cover images of THE ART OF NORVAL MORRISSEAU /Sinclair, Lister, Jack Pollock, and Norval Morrisseau/; ISBN: 0-458-93820-3 /Toronto, Ontario: Methuen, 1979./ - Compiled by Spirit Walker

Monday, July 7, 2008

1st Red Lake Woodland Arts Festival: A Tribute to Norval Morrisseau and the Woodland Artists ended YESTERDAY!

July 4th-6th, 2008
-
Honouring Barry Peters (b. 1958)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"Wiskey Jack + The Deer Head", © 1977 Barry Peters
/Courtesy, Triple K Cooperative, Inc./
-
Barry Peters was born 1958 in Red Lake, Ontario. He is well known artist of the Woodland (Anishnaabe) School of Art Movement and was on of several painters associated with the Triple K Co-operative, a silkscreen operation based in Red Lake. Triple K Co-operative artists also included Norval Morrisseau, Goyce Kakegamic, Joshim Kakegamic, Saul Williams, and Paddy Peters. His art depicts the legends of the Oji-Cree people, and shows the influence of early Woodland School artists such as Norval Morrisseau and Benjamin Chee Chee.
-
For more information about the Triple K Co-operative go to WIKIPEDIA.
-
* For more information go to: www.redlakemuseum.com.
-
> > > If you would like to contibute to the NORVAL MORRISSEAU BLOG providing material(s) from the 1st Red Lake Woodland Arts Festival contact the Blog Master at spiritwalker2008@gmail.com. < < <
-
* The image in this posting: "Wiskey Jack + The Deer Head", 25"x35", Serigraph on Arches paper, Edition: 56, © 1977 Barry Peters /Courtesy, Triple K Cooperative, Inc./

Sunday, July 6, 2008

1st Red Lake Woodland Arts Festival: A Tribute to Norval Morrisseau and the Woodland Artists ends TODAY!

July 4th-6th, 2008
-
Honouring Triple K Co-operative, Inc. (established 1973)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
"All Within", © 1978 Norval Morrisseau /Courtesy, Triple K Cooperative, Inc./
-
-
The Triple K Co-operative Inc. and its important contributions to the art scene in Ontario and beyond, has been celebrated this summer during the Red Lake Woodland Arts Festival. But you might find yourself asking "what was the Triple K, and why is it important"?
-
The Kakegamic brothers: Joshim, Goyce and Henry from Sandy Lake started the Triple K silk screening co-operative in downtown Red Lake in 1973. Influenced by their brother-in-law Norval Morrisseau, Goyce and Joshim Kakegamic had begun to paint in their teens. When the Co-operative was formed, they were in their twenties and had both achieved recognition as professional artists in their own right. "Triple K" artists included Norval Morrisseau, Goyce Kakegamic, Joshim Kakegamic, Saul Williams, Barry Peters and Paddy Peters. Today, their works can be found in the collections of the Canadian Museum of Civilization, the McMicheal Canadian Art Collection, and the Thunder Bay Art Gallery, to name a few.
-
The Triple K Co-operative was unusual in several ways. First, it was established in the belief that Aboriginal artists should control all phases of their art production, from the design conception through to the marketing of the final product. This was revolutionary. Another unusual aspect of the Co-operative was that it was established close to the origins of the Woodland style of art in northwestern Ontario and close to the homes of the artists. But this location was far away from southern Ontario, specifically Toronto, which was viewed as the centre of the province's art scene. This was a radical innovation. Despite all of the odds stacked against them, by the late 1970s the Triple K Co-operative's high quality silk screen prints were being distributed to over 50 galleries across Canada, the United States, and Europe. In 1977, the Royal Ontario Museum recognized the importance of the Triple K by holding an exhibit of its silk screens. As the ROM catalogue says, "For a fine arts co-operative to survive at all is unusual. For a Native-run arts enterprise to operate successfully out of an isolated northwestern Ontario town sounds at the best improbable. But the Triple K is a reality."
-
For more information about the Triple K Co-operative go to WIKIPEDIA.
-
-
- Download RED LAKE WOODLAND ARTS FESTIVAL SCHEDULE!
-
* For more information go to: www.redlakemuseum.com.
-
> > > If you would like to contibute to the NORVAL MORRISSEAU BLOG providing material(s) from the 1st Red Lake Woodland Arts Festival contact the Blog Master at spiritwalker2008@gmail.com. < < <
-
* The image in this posting: "All Within", 25"x35", Serigraph on Arches paper, Edition: 50, © 1978 Norval Morrisseau /Courtesy, Triple K Cooperative, Inc./