Monday, July 19, 2010

Norval Morrisseau Conspiracy Unveiled (Part II)

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Exhibit No. 1
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The Following is an agreement that Norval Morrisseau signed with Kinsman Robinson Galleries giving them 'the completely exclusive right for Canada to market his paintings and drawings' that appeared in a questionable 'Expert Report' by Donald C. Robinson.
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~ Donald Robinson originally wanted to get 'the completely exclusive right for the world to market Norval Morrisseau's paintings and drawings' to which Norval Morrisseau objected (see below).
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~ Dated March 6th, 1990
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/click HERE to read what preceded to the signing of this document as presented on Kinsman Robinson Galleries' blog on August 23rd, 2008/
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Norval Morrisseau dealt with signing off the papers with a "white man" in a very "indian way". In 1962 when Jack Pollock wanted to drew up a standard consignment with Norval Morrisseau in connection with paintings to be exhibited in his first public showing at The Pollock Gallery in Toronto, Norval Morrisseau "glanced at the form and tore it to shreds, quoting his grandfather, 'White man's papers are absolutely worthless and not to be believed."*
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* - quotation from page 18 in "The Art of Norval Morrisseau" /Sinclair, Lister, Jack Pollock, and Norval Morrisseau/ -Toronto, Ontario: Methuen, 1979; ISBN: 0-458-93820-3/
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The individuals involved in this conspiracy state that 'no gallery officially representing the artist standing behind these paintings'. Also they state that 'no Jack Pollock label has ever been found on any of these purported Morrisseau paintings. Yet all those '70s painting were supposed to have been done during the strongest period in the Morrisseau - Pollock connection. Which then over-lapped with the period Norval spent with a couple of apprentices.'
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MANY PEOPLE KNOW that majority of the Norval Morrisseau's paintings were not acquired from the artist's "official representatives" such are The Pollock Gallery and Kinsman Robinson Galleries but directly from the artist.
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There are large quantity of Norval Morrisseau's paintings offered door-to-door by the artist and sold for a pure survival and many were just given away as his appreciation towards people that assisted him along his life's journey. Many times Norval Morrisseau would acquire 'the things of interest' by providing a number of paintings for an exchange. There had been moments where he would be 'entertained' by male escorts from Vancouver, flying to Thunder Bay, and they would demand 'a specific number of paintings' rather than money 'for services rendered'.
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There is also a well known case when the group of lawyers from Thunder Bay purchased large number of paintings from Norval Morrisseau to use them as a tax write-off. Donald C. Robinson of Kinsman Robinson Galleries commisioned a 270 page report for 211 Norval Morrisseau paintings that lawyers Zelinski, Whent and Pustina of Thunder Bay, Ontario purchased from 1984 to 1986 (click HERE to read a thank you letter to Donald C. Robinson written and signed by Nicholas J. Pustina & click HERE for more information about this court case). It is strange that in 2005 Donald C. Robinson in Kinsman Robinson Galleries' publication "NORVAL MORRISSEAU - Return to the House of Invention" stated the following which was contrary to the information presented in this exhibit and elswhere: "The 1980s were turbulent years for Norval. After his break from the Pollock Gallery and its final collapse in 1983, the artist's productive life was seriously interrupted by bouts of destructive alcoholism. His artistic productivity was next-to-nothing during these periods." (see Page 144)
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>>> NONE OF THESE PAINTINGS MENTIONED HEREIN HAVE GALLERY STICKERS AND/OR BILLS OF SALE FROM THE 'OFFICIAL REPRESENTATIVES' & THERE ARE THOUSANDS OF THEM, MANY OF WHICH ENDED IN PRIVATE COLLECTIONS, GALLERIES, MUSEUMS AND AUCTION HOUSES ALL OVER NORTH AMERICA AND BEYOND. <<<
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NOTE: It is a shame that gallery who claims to be a 'Norval Morrisseau principal dealer' treats disrespectfully paintings that they do not own and glorify the artworks on their gallery's 'Morrisseau inventory list' rather than treating every Norval Morrisseau artwork with same respect. It is obvious that their agenda is to 'what benefits them' and not 'what would the general public be able to benefit from' (see Exhibit No. 14).
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