Sunday, February 28, 2010

'Weekend of Awakening'... A Year Later

/February 28th - March 1st, 2009/
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- Norval Morrisseau Conspiracy Exposed
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Norval Morrisseau/Copper Thunderbird (1931-2007)

~ Illustration by Spirit Walker
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>>> The 'Weekend of Awakening', presented a year ago today, was dedicated to the term that had never been used on this blog before
-'The Norval Morrisseau Conspiracy'. This conspiracy involves a couple of galleries (Kinsman Robinson Galleries and Coghlan Art Studio & Gallery) and a few individuals who were closely associated with the artist namely Donald C. Robinson and Paul C. H. Robinson of the Kinsman Robinson Galleries in Toronto, Ontario; Bryant Ross who is director of Coghlan Art Studio & Gallery in Aldergrove, BC; Gabor Vadas who for the last 20 years of Norval Morrisseau's life functioned as Mr. Morrisseau's guardian and business manager; Ritchie 'Stardreamer' Sinclair - an individual who single-handedly caused the greatest harm to the Norval Morrisseau Art Market and whose name is infamously connected with the Legacy of Norval Morrisseau; John Zemanovich a.k.a. Raven Thunderbird who was Blog Master of http://honouringnorvalmorrisseau.blogspot.com (suspended in October 2008) and Mark Anthony Jacobson a.k.a. PEY-SIM-AWAY-APEY-BINASI.
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Among the information never before seen on the 'NORVAL MORRISSEAU BLOG' a series of signed 'Certificates of Authenticity' had been presented for paintings done in the styles that Norval Morrisseau used mostly during the decade of the 1970's. These legally binding 'Cerificates of Authenticity' were signed and thumbprinted by Norval Morrisseau as he personally handled and inspected the 'front and reverse' of each canvas painting for his identifying marks. These 'Certificates of Authenticity' were eyewitnessed during their presentation to Norval Morrisseau.
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From the very beginning of the NORVAL MORRISSEAU BLOG I felt the need to create a platform that will speak for Norval when this priviledge to speak for himself was put in the hands of others that were only interested in their personal financial gain by putting the Legacy of Norval Morrisseau aside.
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Miigwetch,

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Ugo Matulić a.k.a. Spirit Walker
/spiritwalker2008@gmail.com/
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> For the purposes of this blog I would like to be referred to as Spirit Walker. Miigwetch!
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The following posts are part of the 'Weekend of Awakening':
/For better understanding please read the corresponding comments!/
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Weekend of Awakening /An Introduction/,
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Spirit Walker meets Copper Thunderbird (Part III),
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Norval Morrisseau's Certificate of Authenticity (Part I),
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Changing Faces of Ritchie "Stardreamer" Sinclair (Part IV),
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Norval Morrisseau's Certificate of Authenticity (Part II),
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Others about NORVAL MORRISSEAU BLOG (Part I),
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The Genius of Norval Morrisseau,
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Norval Morrisseau's Certificate of Authenticity (Part III),
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Spirit Walker meets Copper Thunderbird (Part IV),
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Changing Faces of Ritchie "Stardreamer" Sinclair (Part V),
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Manipulative Nature of Gabor Vadas (Part I),
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Norval Morrisseau's Certificate of Authenticity (Part IV),
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www.norvalmorrisseaulegaldefencefund.com,
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Norval Morrisseau's Certificate of Authenticity (Part V),
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Mother Earth (Part IV),
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Norval Morrisseau's Certificate of Authenticity (Part VI) &
- Weekend of Awakening /The Summary/.
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* The illustration of this post is constisted of the following:
- The photograph of Norval Morrisseau taken at the opening of his first art exhibition at Pollock Gallery in Toronto, 1962;
- The background image taken from the illustration of the book "Crooked River" by Shelley Pearsall /ISBN: 0-375-82389-1/ &
- The "Copper Thunderbird" Syllabics signature of Norval Morrisseau extracted from an original painting: "Syllabics": 53"x112", © 1980 Norval Morrisseau /Private Collection/

The Genesis of Norval Morrisseau Conspiracy

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* The content previously published on November 22nd, 2008 (click HERE)
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---------"Ancestral Spirit with Evil Serpent", © 1977 Norval Morrisseau
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An authentic painting by Norval Morrisseau not given the recognition it deserved in the 'National Post' article:
"Morrisseau fakes alleged" /National Post, May 18th, 2001/.
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There are and have been many misrepresentations by people with respect to the works of Norval Morrisseau. I direct the reader to Exhibit "A" which is an article in National Post of May 18th, 2001. In the second paragraph Mr. Don Robinson (of Kinsman Robinson Galleries*) states that he was suspicious of the authenticity of 23 paintings which were brought to him by another collector who purchased them at Kahn Auctions. I enclose in Exhibit "B" a statement from that collector. Mr. Robinson in the article only mentions that he bought some works of Norval Morrisseau at Kahn Auctions himself. In fact, over the period between late 1999 and early 2000 Mr. Robinson actually purchased 28 painting from the same auction house (please see Exhibit "C"), he openly encouraged other people to buy them and unsuccessfully bid on another 40 to 60 more paintings from the same auction house. Please refer to Exhibits "D" and "E" which are the statements from the auction house owners. Mr. Robinson in fact tried to get the supplier to sell to him directly and bypass Kahn auctions. The statements of the auction house owners clearly show this. Mr. Robinson also states in the article that Norval knows who are painting these "fakes" but to date he has never named them nor pursued legal action against them. The question is why would Mr. Robinson and his legal team not pursue the people Norval says he knows were painting these so called "fakes"? In fact, Mr. Robinson and Mr. Morrisseau's management team would be deficient in their fiduciary duties to Mr. Morrisseau by not pursuing these people which he says Norval said he knows are painting them. Moreover, to date Mr. Robinson and Norval's handlers cannot point to one case where they have proved that someone made, sold, distributed or even marketed one "fake". Not one case.
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Please now refer to Exhibit "F" which is the May 19th, 2001 letter from Don Robinson to his clients. It is interesting that in this letter Mr. Robinson does not mention the name of Kahn Auctions. Nor does he mention the fact that he bought and sold paintings from Kahn auctions in his gallery but contends that the collector who brought the paintings which were purchased from the same auction house (and same source) were fakes.

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- APPRAISALS DONE BY KINSMAN ROBINSON GALLERIES FOR PAINTINGS PURCHASED FROM KAHN AUCTIONS

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Kinsman Robinson claim to be experts with respect to the authenticity of Norval Morrisseau paintings. Please now refer to Exhibit "G" which shows an appraisal done by Kinsman Robinson Galleries from a client who clearly states where the paintings were purchased (Kahn Auctions) and the subsequent appraisal as of August 18th, 1999. Also, another appraisal done on October 30th, 2001 of the paintings also purchased at Kahn Auctions has been presented. In both cases the Kinsman Robinson Galleries provided appraisals. It is funny that the same auction house where Mr. Robinson purchased his Morrisseaus says are now fakes were appraised and authenticated by his own gallery as being authentic.

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I now refer the reader to Exhibit "H". Here is the correspondence from Mr. Robinson's own lawyer stating that Mr. Robinson did in fact purchase the painting(s) that he never bothered to tell the newspaper nor his own clients as per point 5 as per page 2 . Moreover, it was Mr. Robinson who was victimized and "taken in". Some expert. Mr. Robinson contends they are fakes but he has interestingly never asked for his money back. As far as the continuing investigation it's been seven (7) years and still no mention of anything. I guess experts take their time.

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I keep reading in the various national publications (National Post, Toronto Star, The Globe and Mail, even the Toronto Sun) etc. about the existence of all these so called fakes. However, I have yet to hear of anyone, anywhere or at any time being convicted or even charged with selling/distributing...etc of such Norval Morrisseau fakes. Moreover, at the opening of the Morrisseau show at the McMichael Gallery; Gabe Vadas proclaimed that he had a disk of 1200 Morrisseau paintings, 800 of which according to Gabe were fakes. I also enclose as per Exhibit "I" a copy some correspondence with Mr. Vadas' lawyer in Vancouver where his lawyer admits to the existence of this disk.

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- NORVAL MORRISSEAU HERITAGE SOCIETY

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This now brings me to the Norval Morrisseau Heritage Society (NMHS). Mr. Morrisseau's children want and have nothing to do with this Committee. In fact it is their preference that this Committee be disbanded. This Committee is supposed to work at arm's length and be independent yet they do not even have their own web site. Moreover, the only way to contact the Committee is via a post office box in Ottawa that is mentioned on Kinsman Robinson Galleries' web site. So much are independence and impartiality. Mr. Robinson has set up the Committee as his straw man. He then went to ADAC and had them implement a policy they prevented another member of the association to have the ability to authenticate a Morrisseau but then have other members of ADAC refer to the NMHS to provide the authentication.
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With respect to Mr. Morrisseaus' Estate. Norval's family was left with nothing. It is one of the purposes of the Norval Morrisseau Legal Defence Fund to raise funds in order to help Norval's children at least benefit from any future dispositions of their father's works including all intellectual rights.

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To conclude, I ask the reader to forward a copy of this site to any other collector and send a link to your local newspaper. I will keep people informed as to where and how payments to the Norval Morrisseau Legal Defence Fund can be made.
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Source: www.norvalmorrisseaulegaldefencefund.com
------------(Not currently active)
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* - Kinsman Robinson Galleries /Principal Morrisseau dealer - Representing Norval Morrisseau (1932-2007) and his artwork over the last nineteen years./
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~ "The Writing On The Wall... Norval Morrisseau Conspiracy Exposed" ~

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* This post has been originally published on March 7th, 2009 (click HERE)
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Internationally acclaimed artist Norval Morrtsseau, centre, was awarded a sacred eagle feather by friend and fellow artist Blair Debassige, right at the OCF Friday. Mr. Morrisseau's adopted son Weekan*, left, was on hand for the ceremony. -

Debassige presents an eagle feather to idol: internationally acclaimed artist Morrisseau

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Jennifer McCauley,
The Manitoulin Expositor, published September 29, 1999
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M'CHIGEENG - It was a poignant moment for M'Chigeeng artist Blair Debassige as he presented his idol, interna­tionally acclaimed artist Norval Morrisseau, with an eagle feather, the highest honour an aboriginal person can receive.
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The sacred ceremony was held last Friday at the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation (OCF) in M'Chigeeng. When one receives an eagle feather, that person is being acknowledged with gratitude, love and ultimate respect, says Mr. Debassige, who owns Nimkee art gallery in M'Chigeeng.
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"I hold a lot of respect for Norval as an artist, but also as a friend," be says. "This is my way of honouring him." Mr. Morrisseau could not describe the depth of feeling receiving a sacred Ragle feather invokes. "It is like receiving a star on Hollywood, but better," he says.
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The intensity of emotion cannot be described by English words, says Weekan, Mr. Morrisseau's adopted son. "There is no way to trans­late those feel­ings from Ojibwe into English," he adds. "The only compari­son I can make is the intense feelings you fall in love with someone and every­thing is per­fect."
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The ceremo­ny began with Paul Nadjiwan, executive director of the OCF, leading the M'Swanoodin singers in an opening song as they rhythmatically beat the ceremonial drum. The feather was then prepared with sacred tobacco. In this way, the eagle and the Creator are notified of the name of the new eagle feather holder. After the feather was pre­pared, Weekan, accompanied by Mr. Debassige, pushed Mr. Morrisseau's wheelchair around the circle in time to the drum's beat.

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All those who came to witness the cere­mony were encouraged to dance behind Mr. Morrisseau to demonstrate their support. At the song's conclusion, Mr. Debassige presented the feather to his "role model."
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Anyone who receives an eagle feather must make a home where the feather will be kept. The feather also must be fed by holding or wearing it at sacred ceremonies. By doing this, the feather becomes recharged with sacred energy.
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Mr. Debassige's dream was finally realized with Mr. Morrisseau's visit to Manitoulin. Since the age of 13, Mr. Debassige has dreamed of painting in his studio with the man who has become known as the father of Woodland Indian art.
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Mr. Morrisseau plans to use his time on the Island to paint and prepare for the Kinsman Robinson Gallery Show in Toronto next month. The show, which will com­bine old and new paintings, will be the largest exhibition of his work to date. Painting aside, Mr. Morrisseau, who suffers from Parkinsons disease, came to the Island to partake of tra­ditional Anishinabae healing.
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"I consider Manitoulin Island to be the most sacred place in Canada." he says. "Cleaning the toxins from my body is the only way I'm going to get better." The Island air helps to clear his mind and the beauty please his artistic eye, Weekan says.

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"Norval has told me a lot about Manitoulin Island," he adds. "He has helped me to understand the spiritual force that exists in this place. There is so much energy here."
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Since his arrival on the Island last Wednesday, Mr. Morrisseau has begun six new paintings in traditional Woodland style. This type of painting has been termed x-ray vision in the past because the artist depicts the inner work­ings or feelings of the subject.
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The dozen of Mr. Morrisseau's paintings dis­played at Nimkee gallery are explo­sions of vibrant color depicting aboriginal imagery. Bright melon, canary yellow, fuchsia, vermilion, aqua­marine, violet and royal blue bring the pictures to life, emphasizing, the black outlines of the subjects. Occa­sional touches of softer pastels or earthy brown tones soothe the eye.

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"I paint with these colors to heal," he says. "My paint­ings honor the "Ahneesheenahpay" ancestors who have roamed the Great Lakes for centuries upon centuries. My art records and preserves the legends, art, songs and beliefs of the "Ahneesheenahpay," not only for this generation, but for all future "Ahneesheenahpay."

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The compositions, which range in price from $3,200 to $15,000, are painted on canvas or Arches paper. Unlike most artists, Mr. Morrisseau draws his inspira­tion from his "inward reserves" rather than looking to his surroundings or environment for ideas.

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"My heart and soul is reflected into my mind and my mind is reflected into my hands."
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His inspiration originates from the stories and legends he heard as a boy. Born in 1932, on the Sand Point Lake Reserve north of Thunder Bay, he learned traditional Ojibwe customs, values and beliefs from his grandparents.

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During his youth, Mr. Morrisseau received his "mis­sion" from his grandfather to share through art all of the values he was taught to respect about the Ojibwe culture.

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It was in the 1950s, while hospitalized with tuberculosis that he began painting and drawing his visions on birch bark and brown paper bags. Although his beginnings were humble, he now has more than 40 one-man shows under his belt.

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Mr. Morrisseau wears many hats. Aside from being a renowned artist, he is also a Shaman (or medicine man) and a published author. In Travel to the House of Inven­tion, he pens a powerful account of his life and art career.

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From the first time he picked up a brush, painting became his passion, he says. Over the years that passion has grown and strengthened.

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"There is no other way to describe it," he says. "To paint is to live."

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* Weekan - Gabor (Gabe) Vadas
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Source:
- "Debassige presents an eagle feather to idol: internationally acclaimed artist Morrisseau"
/to view an original The Manitoulin Expositor's article click above/
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~ As per conversation with Kathleen Debassige, former co-owner of Nimkee Art Gallery. She told me that Norval Morrisseau had stayed for 10 days in the gallery in September/October of 1999. She also stated that at no time were there any negative or critical comments made by Norval Morrisseau regarding the gallery’s art collection. She said that he stayed initially for one week and then went into Toronto to open an art show at Kinsman Robinson Galleries. After the exhibition he came back to M'Chigeeng and stayed with them at the gallery for another three days before going back home to Nanaimo, British Columbia. She also mentioned that he signed the gallery’s guestbook and he allowed many photos with numerous people and his art to be taken. As a closing statement she mentioned that he painted many new artworks in the gallery’s studio and that he genuinely enjoyed his visit as much as they enjoyed having him.
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1. Norval Morrisseau in a truck in front of the OFC
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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2. Norval Morrisseau and Gabe Vadas during the ceremony at OFC
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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3. Norval Morrisseau with OCF executive director Paul Nadjiwan
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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4. Norval Morrisseau with artist David Migwans at OCF
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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5. Norval Morrisseau with Kathleen Debassige's daughter Sabrina
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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6. Nimkee Art Gallery, M'Chigeeng, Ontario
Lower level - Art Gallery
Upper level - Studio; w
here Norval Morrisseau stayed during his visit
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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7. Norval Morrisseau at Nimkee Art Gallery Studio
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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8. Norval Morrisseau and Gabe Vadas at Nimkee Art Gallery Studio
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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9. Norval Morrisseau and a tourist at Nimkee Art Gallery Studio
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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10. Norval Morrisseau painting at Nimkee Art Gallery Studio
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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11. Norval Morrisseau wearing hat Kathleen Debassige made from his bear fur robe at Nimkee Art Gallery /Click on image to Enlarge/
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12. Norval Morrisseau with Kathleen Debassige and her children Sabrina, Dakota and Raven at Nimkee Art Gallery
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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13. Norval Morrisseau talking with Kathleen Debassige while her children Dakota and Raven running in a background at Nimkee Art Gallery /Click on image to Enlarge/
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14. Kathleen Debassige's daughter Sabrina and a friend with Norval Morrisseau at Nimkee Art Gallery /Click on image to Enlarge/
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15. Norval Morrisseau with William McMullan and a friend at Nimkee Art Gallery /Click on image to Enlarge/
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16. Norval Morrisseau with Gloria McMullan at Nimkee Art Gallery
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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17. "Untitled", 58"x138", © 1979 Norval Morrisseau, painting on canvas exhibited at Nimkee Art Gallery
(Collection of Kathleen Debassige) /Click on image to Enlarge/
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18. Norval Morrisseau smiling in front of the painting "Untitled", 58"x138", © 1979 Norval Morrisseau, painting on canvas exhibited at Nimkee Art Gallery
(Collection of Kathleen Debassige) /Click on image to Enlarge/
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19. "Untitled", 58"x138", © 1979 Norval Morrisseau, painting on canvas exhibited at Nimkee Art Gallery
(Collection of Kathleen Debassige) /Click on image to Enlarge/
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20. Norval Morrisseau signing Nimkee Art Gallery guestbook
/Click on image to Enlarge/

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21. Interior of Nimkee Art Gallery Studio showing Norval Morrisseau paintings ranging from 1970's to 1990's /Click on image to Enlarge/
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BLOG MASTER'S COMMENT:
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Here are 21 photographs of Norval Morrisseau including the Manitoulin island 'Eagle Feather Ceremony' at the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation (OCF). These photographs clearly show Norval Morrisseau's contentment and credibility concerning the paintings that these few individuals have publicly slandered as 'questionable', 'fakes', 'forgeries', 'abominations' and other defamatory attributes and they have now been exposed for the 'conspiracy' surrounding this whole issue. The paintings in the backgrounds are authentic Norval Morrisseau paintings predominantly from the 1970's period. The Eagle Feather Ceremony is a sacred ceremony. Norval Morrisseau knew that with his full heart and soul. It has been said by these individuals that Norval Morrisseau did not have record nor paint in this common style. Which is at the heart of this conspiracy to corner the market by these few scrupulous individuals by trashing this great period and body of work by Morrisseau so that they can sell their much 'later period work' which they hold inventory stock in for sale.
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To these people it's all about 'beating out the competion' through slander and disinformation spread by themselves. A spiritual man of Morrisseau's calibre would not 'dare to accept' an eagle feather in such a spiritually charged place as Manitoulin Island under 'false pretense' of his artwork clearly shown displayed on the walls of the gallery where this ceremony had taken place. Mr. Morrisseau would have considered this 'sacreligious' to say the least and would not put his soul and spirit in jeopardy if he didn't feel right about being there and having his own artwork prominently displayed and be awarded an eagle feather.
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CLOSING STATEMENT:
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The reason why I started this blog more than two years ago was due to false statements made by Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Coghlan Art Studio & Gallery and individuals* (a List of Individuals presented at the end of this paragraph) closely associated with Norval Morrisseau regarding paintings in question. I felt the need to create a platform that will speak for Norval when this priviledge to speak for himself was put in the hands of others that were only interested in their personal financial gain by putting the Legacy of Norval Morrisseau aside.
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I am dissapointed that Norval Morrisseau Heritage Society is not honouring their mission statement which states:
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"The Norval Morrisseau Heritage Society was established at the request of Norval Morrisseau to research, document and preserve his artistic achievement and protect the integrity of his art. It seeks to achieve this mission by establishing and maintaining a registry of his works, publishing and updating a catalogue raisonne of his artistic output and providing the necessary expertise to authenticate his art."
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"Why are they silent? Is their silence approval for what has been presented on Ritchie 'Stardreamer' Sinclair's www.morrisseau.com and by individuals in question? If they truly care in "protecting the integrity of Norval Morrisseau's art" they would need to speak up. Their silence is hurting the legacy of the man they are supposed to protect and the longer they wait to publish a public statement regarding this matter presented herein, the longer the legacy of Norval Morrisseau will suffer.
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Miigwetch,
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Spirit Walker
/spiritwalker2008@gmail.com /
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* - Donald (Don) Robinson of the Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Bryant Ross of the Coghlan Art Studio & Gallery & Gabor (Gabe) Vadas, who for the last 20 years of Norval Morrisseau's life functioned as Mr. Morrisseau's guardian, business manager and 'adopted' (although not legally so) son.
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Friday, February 12, 2010

Norval Morrisseau: 'Best Canadian painter ever'

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* This post was originally published on January 23rd, 2008 (click HERE)
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Norval Morrisseau, 1970's
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NORVAL MORRISSEAU: BEST CANADIAN PAINTER EVER

I'm guessing that when the 2010 Vancouver/Whistler Winter Olympics finally roll around there's going to be lots of references to Aboriginal culture. Lots of dancing, drumming, native dress, references to aboriginal creation myths during the opening ceremonies; some elders will be brought in to bless the proceedings, that kind of thing. You can already see them using an Inuksuk (those Inuit 'rock piles') as one of their official icons. And as it should be. I have no problem with it, in fact I'm all for it. Like Australians we post-centennial, post-modern Canadians like to reach back to the deep time or the dream time when it comes time to show our face to the world. How real we are. The indigenous art. What inspired up and out from the land before the blight of colonialism. See, "we" are as ancient as everybody else. As old as Europe. I suppose its a kind of progress really, but a large dose of irony might still be necessary amidst all our mutual, terribly official self-congratulation.

Residential schools aside - check out Bill Reid on the twenty dollar bill. Bill Reid at the Vancouver airport. And my personal favourite, Bill Reid at the Canadian Embassy in Washington.

Many a Canadian white boy and girl has ventured forth into The Bush, however clumsily, trying to catch a whiff of the spirits. Going deep, getting back, oh yeah - getting real. Going back to the earth, because as the late, great Canadian poet Gwendolyn MacEwen once wrote: "No one invited us here."

But I wonder if any "Canadian" (and yes, in the context of this post I do feel the need to put that word in quotation marks) ever saw this 'real spirit' behind the surface of what we now call Canada better and more vibrantly than the recently, dearly departed Norval Morrisseau. His paintings were literally churning from the inside out. Skeletal and skeletons. Often called "x-ray". People within animals and animals within people and animals within animals within people covered in flowers riding on a fish, and all of it singing in the most glorious colour. And so out there and dangerous, freaky, hallucinogenic, tripping the bounds of sanity, and erotic. And inspired by sacred, ancient aboriginal myth.

"Why am I alive?"he said in a 1991 interview with The Toronto Star. "To heal you guys who are more screwed up than I am. How can I heal you? With color. These are the colors you dreamt about one night."

I've adored his work for years, before I ever knew his name or even knew who the heck he was. I bought my first Norval Morrisseau print a few years back at some poster sale in Hamilton and I remember riding the GO bus back into Toronto with the thing spread out on my lap for the whole trip, taking it in grinning ear to ear, just dazzled. And that was just a print. A poster. I tacked it to my kitchen wall and it made me happy every time I looked at it.

If anyone was the God Father of the Renaissance of Aboriginal Art and Culture that has ultimately made Canada a much humbler, more honest, better and yes more beautiful place, it had to be him. And at its heart the work was a profound movement for justice. That which cannot be denied.

Marc Chagall famously compared him to Picasso.

Keep your Group of Seven's, sure.

But Norval Morrisseau was the Best Canadian Painter Ever.

Reid Neufeld
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Source: Global Health Nexus Blog /Global Health, Politics and Culture/
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Monday, February 8, 2010

Certificate of Registration of Copyright for 'The Artistic Legacy of Norval Morrisseau'

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~ For the Record...
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Certificate of Registration of Copyright for 'The Artistic Legacy of Norval Morrisseau'
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As per Canadian Intellectual Property Office the copyright for 'The Artistic Legacy of Norval Morrisseau' has been registered on June 30th, 2009 in the name of Victoria (Morrisseau) Kakegamic.
/Registration No. 1068638/
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Source: Canadian Intellectual Property Office
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>>> Reference posts:
- Morrisseau Family Foundation,
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About the Morrisseau Family Foundation,
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The Last Homecoming of Norval Morrisseau (Part I),
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The Last Homecoming of Norval Morrisseau (Part II),
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Norval Morrisseau's Family (Part I),
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Norval Morrisseau's Family (Part II),
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In memory of Harriet Morrisseau (Kakegamic),
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Norval Morrisseau's Final Resting Place &
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Extra! Extra! Copyright for the Artistic Legacy of Norval Morrisseau has been registered!..
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... Let the blessings be!

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Friday, February 5, 2010

The Morrisseau Time Machine (Part I)

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When: September 24, 1999;
Where: M'CHIGEENG, Manitoulin Island, Ontario
-----------~The Ojibwe Cultural Foundation (OCF)
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Blair Debassige (right) presented renowned artist Norval Morrisseau (centre) with an eagle feather at a ceremony held on September 24, 1999 at the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation (OCF). Helping out with the ceremony was Morrisseau's adopted son Weekan (Gabor Vadas).
/Click on image to Enlarge/


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Norval Morrisseau with OCF executive director Paul Nadjiwan
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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Morrisseau presented with eagle feather
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Neil Zacharjewicz,
The Manitoulin Recorder, published September 29, 1999
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M'CHIGEENG - Norval Morrisseau saved the life of Blair Debassige. "He taught me who I am inside," suggested Debassige, artist and resi­dent of the M'Chigeeng First Nation. Morrisseau, the Father of Woodland Indian Art who has been compared to such well-renowned artists as Pablo Picasso and Marc Chagall, was presented with aneagle feather by Debassige in a ceremony held at the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation (OCF) Centre held on September 24, 1999.
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The recognizing of a person with an eagle feather, indicated OCF Director Paul Nadjiwan, is one of the highest honors a person can receive. An eagle feather provides a person with an opportuni­ty to speak directly to the spirits, he said, with a straight mind and heart. It conveys a persons thoughts and feelings.The power of the eagle feather comes from the thunderbirds, the most powerful bird in creation, Nadjiwan explained. According to legend, the thunderbirds gave each eagle four of their feathers, which granted the eagles a part of their pow­ers. The thunderbirds rec­ognize the bearer of an eagle feather as being able to use its powers.
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Debassige expressed his appreciation to all who turned out to participate in the ceremony. He said he was very honored to have been able to give an eagle feather to Morrisseau. "He is really something... this man, to me," Debassige stated. Morrisseau indicated his visit to Manitoulin meant a great deal to him. He said he had been planning to visit the area for a long time, as it is a sacred place.
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"I thank my brother, (Morrisseau), for visiting, us here," Nadjiwan said. Everyone can appreciate the contributions he has made to native culture through his works: Nadjiwan suggested, particularly in his work based on the myths of creation. Morrisseau planned to continue his visit to Manitoulin until Tuesday of this week.
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Source:
- "Morrisseau presented with eagle feather"
---/to view an original The Manitoulin Recorder's article click above/

Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Copper Thunderbird Genuine Collage (Part I)

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>>> NORVAL MORRISSEAU BLOG & Protecting the Legacy of Norval Morrisseau continues...
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"Copper Thunderbird Genuine Collage" by Spirit Walker
* Center: Norval Morrisseau at Nimkee Art Gallery in M'Chigeeng, Manitoulin Island, Ontario in 1999 (click HERE) ~ All paintings © 1979 by Norval Morrisseau ~
/Click on image to Enlarge/
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"I don't wish my work to be exploited, but to be properly used as an art form in its proper place where for the generations of the great Ojibway people it can be seen in the future, as well as be appreciated by all our white brothers."
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Norval Morrisseau

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