Tuesday, November 29, 2011

>>> Ritchie R. Sinclair's Incompetencies (Part I)

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* Below presented material has been previously posted on this platform

An introduction of an individual who single-handedly caused the greatest harm to the Norval Morrisseau Art Market and whose name is infamously connected with the Legacy of Norval Morrisseau...

... Ritchie R. Sinclair a.k.a. Stardreamer labeling five authentic Norval Morrisseau paintings as "Inferior Counterfeit Morrisseaus" /published in "Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention", 1997/ articled below:























"Shaman's Astral Journey in a Dream State" (Detail),
© 1995 Norval Morrisseau-"Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention" © 1997 by Norval Morrisseau/Kinsman Robinson Galleries; Key Porter Books Ltd., /ISBN: 1-55013-880-4/















Screen capture from www.morrisseau.com (30-MAR-2009) of the same book cover (Click HERE) when its webmaster Ritchie 'Stardreamer' Sinclair called it an "Authentic Norval Morrisseau" (NOTICE FOR THE "COURT FILE No. CV-08-00366828" HAS BEEN OMITTED FOR THE PRESENTATION OF THIS POST!)
/Click on image to Enlarge/


>>> Approximately two and a half years ago someone had listed on eBay for sale, several pages from the book "Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention". These page images of genuine Norval Morrisseau paintings were screen captured from Ritchie Sinclair's website: www.morrisseau.com and are still active on his website to this present day.

The following are opinions of Ritchie R. Sinclar a.k.a. Stradreamer regarding the paintings from the above mentioned book:
























Image of an original Norval Morrisseau's painting presented in the "Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention"; page 25 /© 1996 Norval Morrisseau/-


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Screen capture from www.morrisseau.com (30-MAR-2009) of the same painting (Click HERE) when its webmaster Ritchie 'Stardreamer' Sinclair called it an "Authentic Norval Morrisseau" (NOTICE FOR THE "COURT FILE No. CV-08-00366828" HAS BEEN OMITTED FOR THE PRESENTATION OF THIS POST!)
/Click on image to Enlarge/

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Image of an original Norval Morrisseau's painting presented in the "Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention"; page 97 /© 1968 Norval Morrisseau/

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Screen capture from www.morrisseau.com (30-MAR-2009) of the same painting (Click HERE) when its webmaster Ritchie 'Stardreamer' Sinclair called it an "Inferior Counterfeit Morrisseau" (NOTICE FOR THE "COURT FILE No. CV-08-00366828" HAS BEEN OMITTED FOR THE PRESENTATION OF THIS POST!)
/Click on image to Enlarge/

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Image of an original Norval Morrisseau's painting presented in the "Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention"; page 103 /© 1970 Norval Morrisseau/

/Currently part of the Collection of Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, University of Oklahoma, Norman, USA - Gift of Dr. and Mrs. R. E. Mansfield, 2003; The Bridgeman Art Library; Image: FJJ 256488/

NOTE: The image of this painting was used as an illustration for April/May 2008 Beaver Magazine article titled 'Flying high with Morrisseau'Mr. Robert Lavack's personal narrative which explores the author's flying adventures with Norval Morrisseau in Ontario's north. 
















Screen capture from www.morrisseau.com (30-MAR-2009) of the same painting (Click HERE) when its webmaster Ritchie 'Stardreamer' Sinclair called it an "Inferior Counterfeit Morrisseau" (NOTICE FOR THE "COURT FILE No. CV-08-00366828" HAS BEEN OMITTED FOR THE PRESENTATION OF THIS POST!)
/Click on image to Enlarge/


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Image of an original Norval Morrisseau's painting presented in the "Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention"; page 109 /© 1979 Norval Morrisseau/-


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Screen capture from www.morrisseau.com (30-MAR-2009) of the same painting (Click HERE) when its webmaster Ritchie 'Stardreamer' Sinclair called it an "Inferior Counterfeit Morrisseau" (NOTICE FOR THE "COURT FILE No. CV-08-00366828" HAS BEEN OMITTED FOR THE PRESENTATION OF THIS POST!)
/Click on image to Enlarge/


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Image of an original Norval Morrisseau's painting presented in the "Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention"; page 111 /© 1980 Norval Morrisseau/

/Currently part of the Collection of the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) - Smithsonian Institution; Formerly in the collection of R.E. Mansfield (1937-2007), donated to NMAI in 2003; Catalog number: 26/4096/


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Screen capture from www.morrisseau.com (30-MAR-2009) of the same painting (Click HERE) when its webmaster Ritchie 'Stardreamer' Sinclair called it an "Inferior Counterfit Morrisseau" (NOTICE FOR THE "COURT FILE No. CV-08-00366828" HAS BEEN OMITTED FOR THE PRESENTATION OF THIS POST!)
/Click on image to Enlarge/-


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Image of an original Norval Morrisseau's painting presented in the "Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention"; page 113 /© 1981 Norval Morrisseau/


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Screen capture from www.morrisseau.com (30-MAR-2009) of the same painting (Click HERE) when its webmaster Ritchie 'Stardreamer' Sinclair called it an "Inferior Counterfeit Morrisseau" (NOTICE FOR THE "COURT FILE No. CV-08-00366828" HAS BEEN OMITTED FOR THE PRESENTATION OF THIS POST!)
/Click on image to Enlarge/

BLOG MASTER'S COMMENTS:

>>> This article was originally posted on April 1, 2009. Where it exposed Ritchie R. Sinclair a.k.a. Stardreamer who had labeled five authentic Norval Morrisseau paintings as "Inferior Counterfeit Morrisseaus". These paintings were published in the "Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention", 1997 ; and are still active on his website to this present day. This book had been copyrighted by Norval Morrisseau and Kinsman Robinson Galleries.

The above presented findings clearly show  that Ritchie R. Sinclair aka. Stardreamer cannot be trusted in a professional manner in regards to the art legacy of Norval Morrisseau.

On the same day, Ritchie R. Sinclair, who claims to be a Norval Morrisseau's 'chosen  protégé ' , tried to post the folowing comment which I refused to publish:

"Shouldn't the fact that in my opinion these paintings are fakes and yet I've taken them out of KRG's book tell you something Ugo?
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I'm on Norval's side...unlike others money has not clouded my judgement...Why?

>>> Because I am an artist >>> The one Morrisseau chose >>> none of you are painters (with the exception of his forger sons) and none of you spent years painting right beside the master.>>>>>>>

I've been very patient with you Ugo because I thought you were worth the trouble.

>>>>> Those days are now over >>>
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You have 24 Hours to take down your defamatory statements about me. Alternatively I will have your site taken down and sue you for defamation.
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If you think I'm not serious ask your friends how they like dealing with the Canadian Court system and if Ritchie is up to the challenge.
>>>>>>>>>"

*  Click HERE for  this April 1st, 2009 unpublished comment.


NOTES: Ritchie R. Sinclair has never sued me for defamation.

His accusations would not hold up in a court of law.

For a detailed explanation of the defamation laws of the province of Ontario click HERE to read 'THE LAW OF DEFAMATION' article. The law states: "Truth is a complete defence. Malice does not negate this defence. For the defence to succeed, however, the words must be true in substance and in fact and according to their natural and ordinary meaning."

Click HERE to view deleted post (with all pertaining comments) from KRG Blog, dated April 4th, 2009, showing Norval Morrisseau, Gabor M. Vadas, Ritchie R. Sinclair and Paul C. H. Robinson having a dinner at Donald C. Robinson's home to commemorate the book launch of the "Norval Morrisseau: Travels to the House of Invention" in September 1997.


Saturday, November 26, 2011

Authenticity known

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* This post had been originally published on May 27th, 2008-

by Ross Montour
May, 2006
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Two weeks ago I attended a major retrospective of Ojibwa artist Norval Morrisseau at Canada's National Gallery of Art. There is nothing 'western' about Morrisseau's art. It grows powerfully and organically out of his own people's Native tradition. It makes no apologies on behalf of its creator - indeed it confronts western sensibilities and announces its own potency. Morrisseau could care less if the 'white man' never declared him credible; he knows his authenticity. Like the great Nanibooshou of his people's legends, Morrisseau shakes his great head, lays down his foot and the leaves fall from the trees. Compare this to European art at the turn of the last century. Photography, a creature of western technology, had only recently reared its head prompting artists to run for the cover of ingenuity. "Something new, something new," became the 'Om' of art. That most deconstructionist of artists Pablo Picasso sheds an interesting light on all of this. When he and others in his circle began co-opting forms from oceanic and African cultures it was an admission of the desperate extremes western artists would go to in order 'break new ground.'

And while their adoring publics were tittering about the greatness of these new maestros' wild and carnivorous works, the newly reforming masters of orthodoxy continued to mischaracterize the sources of Picasso et al's 'inspiration.' They continued to look down their noses at the 'primitives' (savages) who truly created the source art and their cultures. In Canada, Native artists who painted in styles and forms that grew authentically out of their own cultures had to live with the fact that in their own land their works were 'banished' from the cultural temples of white society - i.e. the major public art galleries. For over 40 years the 'esteemed' Art Gallery of Ontario revealed its ethnocentricity by declaring the works of Morrisseau and others as being fit only to be shown in ethnographic and natural history museums. How barren!

Back to the Morrisseau exhibition in Ottawa. After viewing the showing, my wife and I decided to take in the works of the permanent collection. Walking through hall after hall of Flemish masters and Italian renaissance masters etc., we stumbled across a room labeled 'New York School.' Entering the room we were immediately confronted by two massive colour field paintings by Barnett Newman. One of these - 'Red Stripe' [1] - was a triptych nearly 20 feet in height. It almost demanded an act of worship be done. I laughed out loud because, for one thing, it reminded me of my first viewing of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Remember the scene at the end when the cavemen come upon the huge blank monolith, the drums pounding out the rhythm in the soundtrack... Enigmatic to say the least! In the end they worshipped nothing. My sincerest thanks for your patience in reading this rant. I make no apology though - I am, after all, a Mohawk.

Ross Montour
Kahnawake, QC, Canada

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[1] - 'Red Stripe' is referring to the Barnett Newman's 'Voice of Fire'.


Source: Robert Genn's "The Painter's Keys"


>>> Reference post:
- The exhibition that ended institutionalized discrimination against First Nations art at the National Gallery of Canada.

* The painting in this posting: "Shaman Warrior", 48"x23", © 1990s Norval Morrisseau /Private Collection/

Friday, November 25, 2011

Partial Solar eclipse is happening TODAY

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"Grandfather Speaks of Great Ancestral Warrior",
© 1977 Norval Morrisseau ~ Click HERE to view reverse side of canvas or click HERE to read about this painting's history ~ /Click on image to Enlarge/


"I don't wish my work to be exploited, but to be properly used as an art form in its proper place where for the generations of the great Ojibway people it can be seen in the future, as well as be appreciated by all our white brothers."

Norval Morrisseau





* The acrylic painting in this post: "Grandfather Speaks of Great Ancestral Warrior", 61"x58", © 1977 Norval Morrisseau; Click HERE to view this painting offered for sale at Heffel Fine Art Auction House in September 2006

Thursday, November 24, 2011

>>> TOMORROW, Genuine Norval Morrisseau painting auctioned at Joyner Waddington's

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Auction of Important Canadian Fine Art



























"Nature As One", 48"x30", © 1977 Norval Morrisseau
~ Click HERE for inscription on the canvas VERSO
/Click on image to Enlarge/


>>> This, genuine Norval Morrisseau acrylic painting on canvas is going to be auctioned TOMORROW (November 25th, 2011 at 10:00 AM) at JOYNER Waddington's in Toronto, Ontario; Lot #126 (click HERE or HERE).

Provenance:
Maslak McLeod Gallery, Toronto; Owner, Mr. Joseph McLeod
Private Collection, Nova Scotia.

Auction Estimate: $10,000 / $15,000

Location:
275 King Street East, Toronto Ontario Canada M5A 1K2
Tel: 416.504.5100; Toll Free: 1.877.504.5700; Fax: 416.504.6971
E-mail: joyner@waddingtons.ca ; Website: joyner.waddingtons.ca


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>>> Reference posts:
- Genuine Norval Morrisseau painting removed from Levis Online Auctions?,
Genuine Norval Morrisseau painting offered for sale at LEVIS Auctions,
- Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part I); "LEVIS Online Auctions", Calgary, Alberta.
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Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part II); WALKER'S Auction, Ottawa, Ontario.
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Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part III); Randy Potters Estate Auctions, Port Hope, Ontario.
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Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part IV); RITCHIES Auctioneers, Toronto, Ontario.
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Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part V); HODGINS Art Auctions Ltd., Calgary, Alberta.
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Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part VI); Heffel's Auction House, Toronto, Ontario.
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Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part VII); SEAHAWK Auctions, Maple Ridge, BC.
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Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part VIII); LUNDS Auctions, Victoria, BC.
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Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part IX); EMPIRE AUCTIONS, Toronto, Ontario.
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Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part X); "LEVIS Online Auctions", Calgary, Alberta.
- Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part XI); HODGINS Art Auctions Ltd., Calgary, Alberta.
- Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part XII); WALKER'S Auction, Ottawa, Ontario.
- Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part XIII); WADDINGTON'S Auction House, Toronto, Ontario.
- Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part XIV)Sotheby's Art Auction House, Toronto, Ontario.

- Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part XV)Sotheby's Art Auction House, Toronto, Ontario.
- Recent Sales of Genuine Norval Morrisseau's Art at Sotheby's - A Review

- Norval Morrisseau Authentic Paintings at Auction Houses Across North America (Part XVI); Clarkson Auctions and Movers Inc., Stouffville, Ontario.

* The acrylic painting on canvas in this post: ""Nature As One", 48"X30", © 1977 Norval Morrisseau; AUCTIONED at JOYNER Waddington's in Toronto, Ontario; Lot #126 (click HERE)

THANKSGIVING 2011 (USA)

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~ Originally published on 'Anishinaabe Blog' on 10/11/2009

>>> Celebration of the holiday which is celebrated each year on the second Monday of October in Canada and on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States (ancestral land of the Chippewa or Ojibwa people)


















"Looking Northward", © 1970s Norval Morrisseau
~ Issued on a post card to benefit UNICEF
/Click on image to Enlarge/



Giving Thanks for the Good Life

This is the weekend that Canadians, or those of us who live in Canada, give thanks for all that we have in life. It’s an occasion for families to get together. When students come back from school. Where were can sleep away our turkey-induced coma following a massive, but delicious Thanksgiving dinner.

It’s more a secular kind of thanks, though. For Anishinaabe people, and many other practitioners of middle-eastern and eastern religions – giving thanks happens each and every day.
-We give thanks for life. In Anishinaabemowin, we say: miigwetch mno-bimaadiziwin. “Thank you for this good life”.

Mno-bimaadiziwin is more than just a phrase, or general philosophy. It can be said that mno-bimaadiziwin in the thesis for all for Anishinaabe people. Western culture likes to debate “the meaning of life”. For the Anishinaabeg, mno-bimaadiziwin IS the meaning of life.

Long before the colonization of our lands, before our people were exposed to assimilation, Christianity, and european education – our children were taught the ways of the Anishinaabe. One of the most basic teachings was that of balance. The responsibility that human beings were given to look after our friends, family, Mother Earth and ourselves in a balanced way.

The most basic of these teachings is the path of life.

Many Anishinaabe people have heard of the Seven Grandfather teachings. However, before you are to learn of those gifts, our children are taught that there are seven opposites and how to recognize those divergent paths and how they will take you of the sacred “path of life”. This path is called mno-bimaadiziwin.

Once you learn the basics of mno-bimaadiziwin, you can spend a lifetime learning and living the values of Love, Respect, Honesty, Bravery, Truth, Humility and Wisdom.

The word used most loosely in Indian country is the word “teachings”. Teachings are more than a list of seven words. Teachings are more than the words of your wise local Elder. True Anishinaabe teachings have significant substance to them in the form of (1) specific narrative in the language, (2) history, (3) instruction from sacred law, (4) context, (5) songs and (6) ceremonial rites; and (7) action and following through with what you’ve learned.

Even Eddie Benton-Banai, who first translated the Seven Grandfather teachings in the English language (The Mishomis Book, 1979) would be the first to say that these seven teachings offer much more the significant chapter he dedicated in his book.

What Bawdwaywidun offered was a simplified, English pre-amble to the most significant teachings in the Midewiwin society. In reality, the narrative of the Little Boy and the Lodge of the Seven Grandfathers, and each of the seven teachings was something that lasted twenty-one years for the Little Boy.

Sadly, much of that detail has been lost to history – but the Three Fires Lodge and other Midewiwin lodges across the territory continue to carry much of those specific teachings to this day.To learn them, or just to hear them, requires commitment, preparedness, faith, an open heart and an open mind. They are open to anyone to learn. All you need to do is bring your tobacco to the Lodge.

But they can’t be found in any Masters program or new age retreat. Nor can they can’t be found next to the taco stand at your annual pow-wow, or in any one-hour teaching wigwam prior to Grand Entry. As Bawdwaywidun has been known to say: “Come to the Lodge”.

Bob Goulais


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Source: 'Anishinaabe Blog'
              * Blog by Bob Goulais


>>> Reference posts:
- Seven Gifts From Seven Grandfathers &
- TEACHINGS OF THE SEVEN PROPHETS: THE SEVEN FIRES.

* The painting in this post: "Looking Northward", © c. 1970s Norval Morrisseau

~ Norval Morrisseau together with other Canadian native painters had given their art to benefit United Nations Children's Fund UNICEF: "Giving Life" by Jackson Beardy, "Thunderbird" by Clarence Wells, "The Spirit of Life" by Sam Ash and "Anticipation" by Roy Thomas.
>>> Set of 20 post cards included 4 of each of the obove listed art pieces.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

The Best Provenances of Norval Morrisseau Artwork (Part VII)


~ This post was originally published on September 30th, 2011




























"Untitled", © late 1970's Norval Morrisseau
~ PROVENANCE: originally traded by Clifford and Eleanor Whetung with Norval Morrisseau for an exchange for items from their Whetung Ojibwa Crafts and Art Gallery at Curve Lake First Nation, Ontario CANADA
/Click on image to Enlarge for a Closer Examination/


"I transmit astral plane harmonies through my brushes into the physical plane. These otherworld colours are reflected in the alphabet of nature, a grammar in which the symbols are plants, animals, birds, fishes, earth and sky. I am merely a channel for the spirit to utilize, and it is needed by a spirit starved society."

Norval Morrisseau-





Source: Private collector, Port Hope, ONTARIO


NOTE: Norval Morrisseau lived at Curve Lake First Nation, Ontario from 1979 to 1981 when he rented a house from Clifford and Eleanor Whetung.

BLOG MASTER'S COMMENT: Norval Morrisseau was known to use his fingers rather than the paint brushes alone to apply the paint on many artworks executed throughout his artistic career (click on the image above for a closer examination and pay attention to areas which were completed with use of finger(s) or click HERE for the proof of this statement - a "You Tube" video presentation showing Norval Morrisseau's use of his fingers while painting).


ADDITIONAL INFO FOR MORRISSEAU COLLECTORS: 
This painting is still available for purchase at KIJIJI. For pricing and availability click HERE.


>>> Reference posts:
- The Morrisseau Legacy missing links (Part II)
  /The Whetungs of Curve Lake/,

- Norval Morrisseau Painting Techniques (Part II),
- Norval Morrisseau Painting Techniques (Part IV),
- Norval Morrisseau Painting Techniques (Part V),
- Norval Morrisseau Painting Techniques (Part VII),
- The Best Provenances of Norval Morrisseau Artwork (Part I),
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The Best Provenances of Norval Morrisseau Artwork (Part II),
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The Best Provenances of Norval Morrisseau Artwork (Part III),
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The Best Provenances of Norval Morrisseau Artwork (Part IV),
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The Best Provenances of Norval Morrisseau Artwork (Part V) &
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The Best Provenances of Norval Morrisseau Artwork (Part VI). -


* The acrylic painting on canvas in this post: "Untitled", 45"x33", © c. late 1970's Norval Morrisseau; PROVENANCE: originally traded by Clifford and Eleanor Whetung with Norval Morrisseau for an exchange for items from their Whetung Ojibwa Crafts and Art Gallery at Curve Lake First Nation, Ontario CANADA
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Tuesday, November 22, 2011

The Norval Morrisseau Collection

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by www.londongalleries.ca



© 2005 londongalleries.ca
/Click on image to Enter/


About the Artist:

Born in Fort William, Ontario (now Thunder Bay) on March 14, 1931... into the Ojibway Nation, Norval Morrisseau became a legend in his own time... founder of the Woodland School of Art... presented the Order of Canada in 1978... honourary doctorates from McGill and McMaster Universities... major exihibitions in Canada, United States, Germany, and France... he has been called “the Picasso of First Nations artists”.

Norval Morriseau's colourful figurative images are delineated with heavy black lines and X-Ray images. His work is signed with the syllabic spelling of “Copper Thunderbird”, the name bestowed upon Norval, the first grandchild, by his Ojibway grandfather.

This collection of canvas giclées represents in part, a body of his work, acquired directly from the artist during the 1980’s, when Norval resided on the West Coast of Canada.

Bonnie Edwards Kagna MacFarlane
Collector and Author

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SOURCE: www.londongalleries.ca


>>> Reference posts:
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Friends of Norval Morrisseau (Part IX) /Bonnie Edwards Kagna MacFarlane/,
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Friends of Norval Morrisseau (Part VIII) /Leona Lattimer/,
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The Edwards Collection (Part I),
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The Edwards Collection (Part II),
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The Edwards Collection (Part III),
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Ojibway Word of The Day (Part II) &
Norval Morrisseau Blog's endorsement by Bonnie Edwards Kagna MacFarlane.

* The acrylic paintings in this collection © 1988 Bonnie Edwards Kagna MacFarlane. PROVENANCE: All paintings acquired directly from the artist in 1987. Image Copyright in accordance with an agreement with Norval Morrisseau, June 11, 1988.
/S
igned by Norval Morrisseau; witnessed by Gabor M. Vadas/

North American Indians in the Movies (Part II)

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Will Sampson  (1933-1987)


By


Josey Wales: "I came here to die with you, or live with you. Dyin' ain't so hard for men like you and me. It's livin' that's hard. When all you've cared about has been butchered or raped. Governments don't live together, people live together. With governments you don't always get a fair word, or a fair fight. Well, I've come here to give you... either one. Or get either one from ya. I came here like this, so you know my word of death is true. And my word of life, is then true."

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Ten Bears: "There is iron in your words of death, for all Comanche to see. And so, there is iron in your words of life... No signed paper can hold the iron. It must come from men. The words of Ten Bears, carries the same iron of life and death. It is good that warriors such as we meet in the struggle of life, or death. ... It shall be life."


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>>> For more information about Will Sampson click HERE and for more informationa about "The Outlaw Josey Wales" click HERE.


>>> Reference post:
- North American Indians in the Movies (Part I).
  /Ref.: Chief Dan George/
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Monday, November 21, 2011

Norval Morrisseau Exhibition Posters (Part III)

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AVIVA 26th ANNUAL ART SHOW
/April 18, 1978/

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"Mother and Child", © 1978 Norval Morrisseau
~ Poster size: 30"x22" /Click on image to Enlarge/


"Personally I am not thinking about myself truthfully in this present year but years ahead when I am death for the children of mine and the generations of my people to feel proud of the art heritage of the Ojibway and every nationality is proud of its culture."  

Norval Morrisseau

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>>> Reference post:
Norval Morrisseau Exhibition Posters (Part I) &
- Norval Morrisseau Exhibition Posters (Part II).
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Studying Norval Morrisseau: Research project begins on well-known local artist

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/November 11th - December 7th, 2011/-
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"Untitled" (Thunderbird), © 1960's Norval Morrisseau


the Northern Sun News; Published on November 16th, 2011 

Red Lake, Ontario: Famous artist Norval Morrisseau was the topic of conversation when Jessica Wilson and Gaye Sihin stopped by the Red Lake Regional Heritage Centre last Friday. Representing Westerkirk Works of Art out of Toronto, the two are visiting the area in search of told and untold stories about the man who lived in Red Lake from 1959 to 1973.

“We are here doing research for two projects,” explained Wilson on November 11th. “The first project is we are putting on an exhibit with the Assembly of First Nations for their Annual General Assembly next year in Toronto. We work for an organization that has a collection of Norval Morriseau paintings and we are doing some research for a catalogue that is coming out.”

The second project Sihin says is a little less defined. The pair is looking to record interviews with district residents who interacted with the late artist during his time in Red Lake. “Similar to what happened today it is another medium to document and archive information and maybe one day we will have a documentary.”

Morrisseau lived in the Red Lake district for 13 years and spent much of his time depicting Ojibway legends on birchbark, plywood, mill paper, and canvas, some of which can be found in private collections of local or former area residents. Since his death in 2007 Morrisseau’s work has become well known around Canada and now Wilson says the unique style is spreading internationally.

“We really believe he is a pioneer with a truly unique style that is inspiring a whole generation and movement of artists and it is very rare to say that,” characterized Wilson when asked why study Morriseau. “In our own country we are learning about how his art has spread into Europe and his style. People are collecting his work all over the world. We really believe he is more important than he has been given credit for, even though the National Gallery has given him a show, I think that you can’t do enough to promote his art work.”

The duo will be splitting their time between Sioux Lookout and Red Lake until December 7th and encourage all who have a story to tell about interactions with the man to seek them out to be part of the current project. “We came to Red Lake in the hopes that we would meet lots of people who have had experiences with Norval when he lived here and also we would like to learn more about the legend of the area to help us interpret his art,” said Sihin.

Wilson adds no story is too inconsequential. “I think even if they don’t think it is important, like Norval just stopped by one day and grabbed a cup of tea and tried to sell his art work – we want to hear that story.”

The art enthusiasts can be reached by calling (416) 903-4293, by emailing curator@wwoa.ca, or through the Red Lake Regional Heritage Centre.

Jennifer Thurbide


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Source: the Norhern Sun News your community newspaper; proudly serving Red Lake, Ear Falls & Northwestern Ontario

* The painting in this post: "Untitled" (Thunderbird), "30"x62", © c. 1960 Norval Morrisseau /Collection of the Red Lake Museum/